Bohan and Bradstreet

Career Search

July 2016


Interviewing Turnoffs

Wednesday, July 13, 2016  by julie

INTERVIEWING TURNOFFS

The majority of career driven professionals do not interview very often so when a strong motivation occurs to change employment or an opportunity appears that is irresistible, most are unprepared for the interviewing process. Getting an interview can be challenging and requires a marketing driven resume, often a strong network of informed business professionals, the appropriate opportunity, good timing, and a bit of luck. Preparing for the interview requires researching the company and individuals that you will be meeting with, preparing examples of experiences and knowledge that relate to the opportunity, and developing a list of questions that exhibit interest in the business model, culture, leadership, and role.

Assuming all of this has been accomplished, the day of the interview is before you. Here are five turnoffs that derail the most qualified and prepared candidate even if you think you did well.

Too Early or Being Late….Time management is very important. Being too early or arriving late for an interview indicates poor time planning and management. Arrive 3-7 minutes prior to the designated interview time.

Inappropriately Dressed…..know who you are interviewing with and dress for success.  Being too casual is a turnoff just like too much makeup, perfume/cologne, or jewelry. This is not a date nor a casual get together. Be conservative….first impressions are often lasting impressions and made in the first 2-3 minutes of the interview. Interview to impress.

ME and not WE….every company has goals and the role that you are interviewing for will require leading or contributing on teams that are goal driven. When an applicant is too heavy on the self-promotion and their personal advancement, it is a turnoff. Illustrations of experiences, contributions, and knowledge must be a combination of “me” and “we” statements that showcase success working with internal and external customers. 

Talking Down on Former Employers or Bosses….Interviewing is not a confessional. Talking poorly about past employers establishes a negative tone and makes the hiring authority question what you might say about them in the future. If you can’t say something positive about your former employer, then do not say anything at all.

Being a “Yes” Person….Companies are looking for candidates that are career driven, want to contribute to the success of the business, and have a voice in change and evolution. That requires a backbone and a desire to speak up and not always agree. If you are portrayed as a “Yes” person then you stand for nothing and you will fall for anything.

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